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1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Fri, Dec 23 2011, 8:12pm
I thought this was really cool!

Ruins in Georgia mountains show evidence of Maya connection
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Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Sat, Dec 24 2011, 9:05am
Incredible. I would've never guessed the Mayan civization reached as far north as Georgia.
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Sun, Dec 25 2011, 7:48pm
Did you see the very first comment that debunked it at the bottom? it was by the guy who's research it was based on...or so he says
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Mon, Dec 26 2011, 5:30pm
That WAS confusing, Goon. No idea what that was all about...
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Tue, Dec 27 2011, 5:26am
It suggests that the author incorrectly drew a conclusion from someone else research and the author corrects him. The author of this article seemed to think that DNA evidence suggested that native americans from his area had mayan DNA though he doesn't present anything more than an anecdote as evidence.

It is reasonable to me to think that some Mayans migrated into the Southern US or that people made it from Africa to So. America etc. etc. Cannibalism evidence in the South west was blamed on a group of Aztecs IRRC. People had the ability to travel just where and when is debatable.
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Tue, Dec 27 2011, 10:21am
Most Indians linked to founding mothers - Technology & science - Science - Genealogy - msnbc.com

Here's something that should interest you Cher!
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Tue, Dec 27 2011, 3:09pm
Whoa..just 6 women huh? Incredible.

One of these days, I am going to do a DNA test for myself. I just find this stuff so interesting.

And I found out just this past year, that I am only a second generation American on my dad's side. My grandmother and her family are from the Bahamas, and are suposedly related to Sidny Poitier. Would be cool to know for sure. =)
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Sat, Dec 24 2011, 4:18pm
Great to have some more clues... hmmm... gonna hafta recheck my DNA i guess, LOL
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Sun, Dec 25 2011, 7:55am
Cool Cherokee.

I knew that they had trading posts here in Florida (one, as yet unexcavated near me on Snodgrass Island), but didn't know of any ruins north of here.

My anthroplogy instructor told me of some evidence that Mayan influcence reached as far north as the Ohio River Valley but that such evidence was controversial.

Good to see that there's something substantial to work with now for Mayan Scholars.
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Mon, Dec 26 2011, 5:30pm
I think several of us will have to, Mz. Linda. =)
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Mon, Dec 26 2011, 6:11pm
yeah, I have Choctaw and Chickasaw besides the Cherokee ... no wonder the Mexicans take me for one of their own...LOL
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Tue, Dec 27 2011, 8:51pm
I think you'll find the mayan spin to be junk science by ancient civilization enthusiasts of the Atlantis and planet X ilk. Similar icons and even actual mayan objects traded and traded again until they reached northern tribes are not proof that any of the mound building societies were relocated remnants of Mayan culture.
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Wed, Dec 28 2011, 2:05pm
This is cool and interesting, if controversial...
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Thu, Jan 5 2012, 8:35am
more good stuff...

Mayan Ruins in Georgia Archeologist Objects, Web Story Goes Viral - ABC News
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Fri, Jan 6 2012, 2:01pm
I think there is enough evidence to say there was at least a Mayan influence, probably trading outposts... the the post fall migration may be a bit far fetched.
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Sat, Jan 21 2012, 7:52pm
Greetings all. Given the human inclination to wander, I would be more surprised to not find evidence of Mayan and other southern cultures within the boundaries of the United States (or anywhere in North America). Provided is a link to some artifacts found in the various mounds within the US boundaries. To my untrained eye...
The Mound Builders, Mound Builders, Giants, Giant Races, The Mound Builders by Mary Sutherland, f MU, Burlington Wisconsin, Burlington UFO and Paranormal Center

Perhaps the mounds are made by pyramid builder wannabes without the huge labor force.

And those Hohokam ball courts in Southern Arizona? Even the type of La Crosse played by some American Indians in historic times seems similar to the games played amongst the southern pyramid builders.

I have wondered at times if there was a sort of Forrest Gump Indian that walked the furthest and met up with the many different groups living across the huge expanse of the North American Continent. Probably the dwarf flute player depicted in rock art throughout the Southwest is closest to the person I envision. There must have been at least one person or group that walked from coast to coast or from Canada to South America. Quien Sabes?
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Sat, Jan 21 2012, 9:46pm
Perhaps the mounds are made by pyramid builder wannabes without the huge labor force.
and the requisite stone to build with?
Kokopelli is not a dwarf: Among the Hopi, Kokopelli carries unborn children on his back and distributes them to women; for this reason, young girls often fear him. He often takes part in rituals relating to marriage, and Kokopelli himself is sometimes depicted with a consort, a woman called Kokopelmana by the Hopi.[1] It is said that Kokopelli can be seen on the full and waning moon, much like the "rabbit on the moon". His flute calls the water serpent that brings the rain that fertilizes the earth.
but, yes, there were traders that went between tribes and regions... how do you think that Pacific Abalone was found in the Mississippian Mounds... and Mica out west... coral etc...
I think that the southern civilizations were extant before the northern tribes made it over the land bridge ... my own opinion.
There must have been at least one person or group that walked from coast to coast or from Canada to South America. Quien Sabes?

Not one, but many... traders, just as there were in Europe or Asia or anywhere else... Si?
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Sat, Jan 21 2012, 10:41pm
Hi MizLinda, here is what I think, not what I know:
It would require someone with highly developed ambasadorial skills to survive the gauntlet of territorial tribes from one coast to the other. Even items for trade would either be depleted or be taken by force long before the trek could be completed. Holy men, shamans and the like could probably not endear themselves to the various local belief systems, a magician would excite fear, I think only a musician could successfully find welcome mats with the huge variety of cultures spanning the continent. Limited trade routes were established with various interested tribes but none were coast to coast.

I agree with the opinion of the southern cultures, maybe they arrived by boats. It would explain the traces of the coca plants found in Egytian mummies.
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Sat, Jan 21 2012, 10:54pm
One scholar states that the Hopi deity is not the same as the flute player found on petroglyphs:

"The association of the Hopi deity and the petroglyphic flute player seems to date to the 1930s, a consequence, it appears, of their shared trait of a hunched back. The icon presently became known as Kokopelli, an Anglicized form of Kookopl. Once the identification was made, it was soon elaborated by scholars both professional and amateur, so that, depending upon the constituency, the icon came to be understood variously as a hunter, dwarf, trickster, seducer, and the like. But there is in fact no reason to identify the flute player with the kachina god. The Hopis themselves associate their fertility god Kookopl with the robber fly, a humped-back insect and a persistent copulator, and the petroglyphic flute player with the cicada (maahu), whose proboscis resembles a flute, whose buzzing the Hopis describe as fluting, and who can appear to have a hump. There is a cicada kachina, whose attributes include ownership of the warming process, for cicadas are credited with bringing warm weather, which the Hopi value as desirable for the growth of their crops."
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Sun, Jan 22 2012, 12:01am
Indeed, much ado was made by white anthropologist "scholars" ... in my opinion of dubious value... whites interpreting native lore they did not understand.
Not being Hopi, I cannot interpret for them. However, I can infer from other tribes' mistranslated traditions that some were mis interpreted, ...

Kokopelli only dates to the 1930's... srsly.. dude.. stay with your photography which you do so well...
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Sun, Jan 22 2012, 12:19am
And they could not have had these people of good ambassadorial skills? People who learned the languages and even bardic skills.. why not? they did in Europe, are you questioning the intellect of the native american? Surely they would have had musical tale telling abilities.. a trader would have brought news of local tribes... as well as far flung trade items... a trader was a sacrosanct person, welcomed by all tribes... obviously there was not one person who went the whole way, but there were local, regional and long distance traders... a network before the term was coined...
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Mon, Jan 23 2012, 8:08pm
*sigh*
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Thu, Jan 26 2012, 1:03am
The evidence does not support what you want to believe. The conspiracy guy's "interpretation" (and I do use that term loosely) and misquoting of the scientist who DID study the area are both too dubious to give his farfetched "theory" any merit. The evidence simply does not support it outside of merely imagining it to be true.
Re: 1100 year old Mayan ruins in Georgia
posted Fri, Jan 27 2012, 1:26am
Well there is quite a lot of grand trading trails that stretch for quite some distances. A famous one that is in my area is the Old North Trail, and they used the Calgary region as a stop over. It went from southern Yukon to New Mexico. I posted about it a few years ago but i cannot find my thread so i will re-post it.

Its a great read, and it shows that yeah if you are determined and willing to walk far you can do it.
The Old North Trail: Chapter XXXIII. The Old North Trail


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