Cryptozoology forums > Cryptids > Unknown Reptiles > view thread
MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Thu, Jun 26 2008, 8:43am
Monsterquest has produced yet another illegitimate episode, called “ Giant Killer Snakes”. The fact that they didn’t uncover substantial evidence of a cryptid (a fact which is prevalent in most of their episodes) isn’t what irritates me. What fuels my animosity is the blatant neglect concerning the eyewitness repot of Trinidad Cortez and the speculations of researcher Ron Magill.

Eyewitness Trinidad Cortez was interviewed: he claimed that a large anaconda attacked, killed and devoured his 13-year old cousin. He went on to say that the snake was killed and was estimated by him to be at least 45 feet. A rather obvious question would be to ask where the body was, yet there is no mention of the whereabouts: I find this absolutely absurd.

Also, the ideas formulated in relation to the python-alligator picture (the picture of a python with an alligator carcass sticking out of its severely ruptured body) and the snake-human picture (the picture of a large snake with a human “carcass” sticking out of its digestive system) are also inexcusable. Ron Magill, an individual associated with the Miami-Dade Metro Zoo, analyzed the two photos: he speculated that the python’s body (in the python-alligator picture) probably burst open due to the teeth or claws of the gator scratching the insides of the python. This has been speculated (over several months ago) by a researcher in an episode on the national geographic channel to be false: the NGC researcher theorized that the teeth couldn’t have caused the alligator to break through the python’s body because the snake had consumed the alligator headfirst, meaning its limbs were pinned against its own body and were unable to move, let alone scratch. In my opinion, the python’s insides were also too constraining to allow the gator to open its mouth (the jaws of alligators are significantly weak when trying to open in comparison to when they are trying to close) on the inside of the serpent in order to cause damage with its teeth. A statement was made by Mr. Magill about the snake-human picture. He said that the position of the human in the snake’s body was “consistent” with how a snake would devour its prey (headfirst). However, on a previous program (several months earlier) on the National Geographic Channel, a researcher said that the human’s position did not indicate that he was swallowed headfirst (you can believe who you want to). This NGC researcher also said that the insides of the snake was too clean to be legitimate, but this idea (whether intentionally or unintentionally) was omitted by Magill.

The reason I criticize the MonsterQuest series is because I know that they have the potential to do better. Their “Mega Hog” episode was very well done and their “Giant Squid Found” episode was productive in that it got footage of what could be the largest squid ever filmed. I have faith in them and will continue to display criticisms until they get serious and formulate a noteworthy program that will exert a positive influence over the common public’s view of crypto zoology.
182 views
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Thu, Jun 26 2008, 11:51am
they're doing another season of MonsterQuest???? sweet!!!!

i'm with you on the fact that most episodes are a bit... odd in the way they go find thiings where there might not be a lot of evidence for them, but i do like the episodes like giant squid, giant river fish and big cats, they were good eps because they actually found evidence
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Thu, Jun 26 2008, 7:48pm
Yas, but what evidence did they get from the giant river fish and big cat episodes? I haven't watched those in a while.
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Fri, Jun 27 2008, 3:37am
In the giant fish episode they got a guy to reconstruct a muskie around the jaws found in (I think) Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, and they found that the fish would jave been the world record.
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Fri, Jun 27 2008, 4:49am
Amazing. I should watch the episode again.
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Mon, Jun 30 2008, 11:05am
yea, and the big cats they found a film, went to the place it was filmed and said it couldn't be a cat
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Thu, Jun 26 2008, 10:47pm
Yeah, but it beats the living snot out of 'Destination Truth'...
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Fri, Jun 27 2008, 3:31am
ROFL, "Twilight Zone" beats the snot out of "Destination Truth" LOL. But then "Twilight Zone" even beats the crap out of "Monster Quest". Those two shows are just horrible.......
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Fri, Jun 27 2008, 9:15am
Like everyone else, I agree that the squid episode was the most well done, and that everything else was poppycock. I tried to watch their swamp beast episode, but couldn't bare to watch them try and use bloodhounds to track the thing. Simply pitiful, and their newest episode "Super rats" does not look promising. A quote from the commercials "It was as big as a car." It does not bode well.
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Sat, Jun 28 2008, 10:41am
A quote from the commercials "It was as big as a car." It does not bode well.

I agree with you. I actually laughed at that
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Sat, Jun 28 2008, 1:03pm
All depends on the size of the car, though...
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Sun, Jun 29 2008, 4:31am
Yeah, if it's a Yugo that's downright tiny...
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Sun, Jun 29 2008, 5:30am
How about a zip zap? those are real tiny
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Mon, Jun 30 2008, 5:10am
What's that? Wait, I'll research... (five minutes pass).
You mean
this? Dude, that's a toy car, I don't think the guy was talking about that.
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Mon, Jun 30 2008, 10:23am
I guess he wasn't but probably a rat the size of a car would've been found by now.
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Mon, Jun 30 2008, 8:29pm
Especially since you'd need quite a few animals to maintain a population, and car sized animals can only hide in the thickest jungle (you know, that ox from Vietnam, thick jungles, and smaller than a car). Anywhere in America is not the thickest jungle.
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Fri, Jun 27 2008, 1:49pm
I was thinking the same thing regarding the snake that was reported to have eaten that girl. Surely someone would have taken the skin. They didn't even mention when this was supposed to have taken place, which would seem to be important.

The python and alligator speculation was nonsense, IMO. I have seen other opinions on that, including one I find far more believable, and that is an attack on the bloated snake by another gator. It's not inconceivable that this could have happened, with the gator attacking the snake, and the snake presenting enough of a threat to scare off the gator, then dying of the wound.

On the supposed human pictures, they didn't seem to really say much beyond what anyone, expert or no, could see from just looking. My question there would be, where and when were these taken, by whom, and if someone died that way, was it reported to the authorities? Surely, if they had a camera handy, and could post online, they could contact the local cops or something. Who were the victims supposed to be, and are they missing?

I do enjoy the show (and my seven-year-old adores it), but they could be a little more thorough in answering some of the obvious questions.

My biggest frustration on this episode was the business with the sonar; I never saw anything that looked like a snake, but they guy TWICE mistook plants for a giant anaconda? The way they acted like something really cool was coming, and then offered the same error, was rather unprofessional. I would not have even included that.
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Fri, Jun 27 2008, 11:11pm
Exactly, and they tryed to hype it up by laying suspenseful music, after they knew the objects weren't snakes.
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Mon, Jun 30 2008, 9:27am
Exactly. That is the sort of thing that makes me want to smack the producers.
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Sat, Jun 28 2008, 1:46am
u are so right about not finding the suposibly killed body
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Sat, Jun 28 2008, 10:18pm
yeah,I loooooove MonsterQuest and I liked "Giant Squid Found" too! I just finished watching "giant fish" and it was great,I'm so glad they're making another one!!!!
I look forward to it when it comes out in my area!
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Tue, Jul 1 2008, 3:20am
MonsterQuest has become something of a favorite of mine. It may not be done particularly well, and they are rather overfond of the whole 3D artist's conception thing, but the information on the cryotids is interesting, the stories of the sightings are enjoyable (and seem ernest more often than not), and some of the ways in which they try to capture the monster on film are rather clever, if apparently doomed to failure. I now they aren't going to find what they're looking for (it would be on the national news if the did), but I quite enjoy it.
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Thu, Jul 3 2008, 10:40pm
I enjoy it for the pure entertainment value. At least it's bringing cryptids to the general public. Accurate or not it's a fun show
Re: MonsterQuest: Giant Killer Snakes
posted Tue, Jul 29 2008, 7:38pm
I find it amazing that many people jump to the most unusual conclusions in many cases. Only when something is sensationalized does it seem to become interesting. I've worked on studies in the Glades' for years. Several points need to be made in regards to exotic repties and their interaction with the wildlife there. First of all the best theory in regards to the Burmese Python/Alligator interaction. The simplest most logical conclusion is as follows...The python encountered and overpowered the alligator. (Not unusual Boas, Pythons and Andacondas are known crocodilian feeders worldwide) The Python was lethargic and less able to flee/defend itself after the large meal. The ensuing struggle may have attracted other alligators. The snake probably was attacked or injured during or after subduing it's meal. The ensuing decomposition and rupture can be explained by decompostion and building bacterial gases....SIMPLE. Also, the claim by many officials that the existence of viable breeding populations in the everglades of pythons was due to pet releases is absurd at best. One must keep in mind the time period it has taken for them to become established is very recent. Keep in mind that when hurricane Andrew hit there were a number of dealers in the area that had large numbers of import babies from Vietnam. In at least one case a single dealer lost an entire warehouse with at least 800 baby "Burms" in stock. Most of the specimens close to urban areas would have been found within the first few years. Those that made it the short distance west would have found very suitable habitat in the area. Just a theory but, one I feel makes much more sense. In regards to "Giant Snakes" killing humans....This has been proven but, very rare. Only a small handfull have been verified. However, that's another discussion.


Close Window